I took a trip to the Gafsa region of Tunisia this weekend, including the mining towns of Redeyef and Umm-al-Arais, where there’s still plenty of unemployment and festering discontent 18 months after the start of the revolution. Speak to locals, and it’s a revolution which began out in these phosphate towns, and not in Sidi Bouzid as is widely reported.  I travelled with local photographer Nacer Talel who interpreted, and we spoke to the unemployed, phosphate company workers and miners, the firebrand unionist Adnan Hajji and formerly jailed journalist Fahem Boukadous. Here’s a blog on the issue for SBS News.

Image

There’s phosphates in them there hills: Photo Bill Code (use with credit and URL)

The face peered down from the statue in the middle of Redeyef’s roundabout; the martyr’s eye keeping watch over his peers.

Images like this one have become commonplace since Tunisia’s revolution was borne from the vegetable seller who self-immolated in a desperate bid for recognition of his situation.

It was in the same style of one particularly his face peering out, along with his name and date of death.

But there it was, clearly written: 2008. Not 2010, the year that Bouazizi kicked off the Tunisian revolution and broader Arab Spring.

Read the rest on the SBS website.

Below – remembering the martyr’s of 2008 alongside those of January 2011. (Photo: Bill Code. Use with credit and URL)

Image

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements
Comments
  1. Celina says:

    This is a great piece, Code.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s